Socratic Hubris; A Way to Understanding Socrates Trial and Execution

Document Type: Original Article

Abstract

There are several debates around why Socrates executed but none of them has explained why he executed at seventy. I think Socratic hubris can explain it. In fact, if we refer to “earlier Socrates” dialogues that cover life of Socrates from youth to seventy years, it is obvious that Socrates on effort to find and present a good life appealed to speech and used it to cross-examine Athenians. However, through it, he acted hubris for many years. Socratic hubris, whether it was apparent and through explicit speech or hidden and through irony, ridicule, and exaggeration, was against Athenian shame culture and against every interlocutors who was examined. In other words, it was against aidos and put Socrates as “I” against Athenians as “Others”. Therefore, it could be considered a guilt and be punished, but since Socratic hubris was personal, and then gradual, he could be alive for about three decades and was executed at seventy.
 

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